Grading Rubrics

Grading Scale:

A = 93-100
A- = 90-92.9
B+ = 87.5-89.9
B = 82.6-87.4
B- = 80-82.5
C+ = 77.5-79.9
C = 72.6-77.4
C- = 70-72.5
D+ = 67.5-69.9
D = 62.6-67.4
D- = 60-62.5
F 59.9

Grading Breakdown:

Online Assignments 3, 4, 6, 7: 24% (6% each)

Online Assignments 1, 2, 5, 8, 9: 20% (4% each)

Class Participation (including Twitter): 12%

Reading Quizzes: 5%

Presentation: 5%

Final Project: 25%

Final Project Paper and Presentation: 9%

Blogging Rubric:

I will evaluate each entry on a scale of 0-4:

4. The blog post has all the required components. When writing is expected, it uses correct spelling and grammar, has a clear, original point, and backs it up with specific evidence. It opens up possibilities for future discussion.

3. The blog entry has most of the required components. When writing is expected, it often uses correct spelling and grammar (but with occasional mistakes), and it has an analytical point, although the point may not be supported with specific evidence or put forth articulately.

2.  The blog entry lacks many of the required components. When writing is expected, it does not have a clear point, lacks specific examples, or has many spelling and grammar errors.

1. The blog post lacks most of the required component and does not follow the assignment guidelines. When writing is expected, the blog entry has a minimal point and specific evidence, and contains multiple grammar and spelling errors.

0. The blog post is not turned in (where turned in is defined as posted on the correct class blog page with the correct category marker).

Reminder:  as per the class late policy, all late posts will lose a point, plus an additional point for every 24 hours they are late.

Twitter Grading Rubric (inspired by Karen Franker’s rubric):

Element Exemplary Proficient Partially Proficient Unsatisfactory
Score 3 2 1 0
Content  Original tweets consistently provide new resources or ideas that add value to the discussion. Most original tweets provide new resources or ideas that add value to the discussion. A few original tweets provide new resources or ideas that add value to the discussion. Original tweets do not provide any new resources or ideas, and add no value to the discussion.
Tweets are creatively and succinctly written to stimulate dialogue and commentary. Most tweets are written to stimulate dialogue and commentary. A few tweets are written to stimulate dialogue and commentary. Tweets are poorly written and do not stimulate dialogue and commentary.
Frequency
Exceeds the required number of tweets. Meets the required number of tweets. Falls just short of meeting the required number of tweets. Fails to meet the required number of tweets.
  Hyperlinks     Tweets include accurate hyperlinks to resources that enhance the topic & use tiny URLS as needed. Tweets include hyperlinks to resources relevant to the topic & use tiny URLS as needed. Some tweets include hyperlinks, but not all resources are relevant to the topic. Doesn’t shorten URLs. Tweets either contain no hyperlinks or selected resources have no relevance to the topic. Doesn’t shorten URLs.
Comments and Contributions Consistently responds to tweets with positive, respectful, and succinct comments while providing a meaningful addition to the discussion. Most responses to tweets are positive and respectful while providing a meaningful addition to the discussion. Some responses to tweets are negative and disrespectful and/or provide little value to the discussion. Responses to tweets are negative and disrespectful and provide no value to the discussion.

Participation (inspired by Maggie Solberg’s rubric):

A: To get an A, all of these qualities must be true of you.

  • Consistently contributes to discussion.
  • Consistently prepared.
  • Consistently makes college-level comments and raises the level of discussion.
  • Consistently attentive and engaged.
  • Never distracting or problematic.
  • A classroom leader: helpful and respectful to peers, the first to jump in.

B: To get a B, only one of these has to be true of you.

  • Does not consistently contribute to discussion, but participates at least once a week.
  • Sometimes unprepared.
  • Does not consistently make college-level comments .
  • Sometimes inattentive or distracting
  • Not a classroom leader: not helpful or respectful to others, not the first to jump in.
  • One use of a cellphone.

C: To get a C, only one of these has to be true of you.

  • Does not often contribute to discussion. Participates less often than once a week but more than once a month.
  • Often unprepared.
  • Often lowers the level of discussion.
  • Often inattentive or distracting.
  • More than one use of a cellphone or any comparable electronic device.

F: To fail, all of these have to be true of you.

  • Rarely contributes to discussion. Participates less often than once a month.
  • Rarely prepared.
  • Rarely attentive or engaged.
  • Usually distracting.

Final Project (inspired by Jentery Sayers’s Rubric):

A- through A+: Offers a very highly proficient, even memorable demonstration of the learning outcomes, and successfully takes a more advanced approach on the tools and methodologies covered in the class, while including some appropriate risk­taking and/or creativity.  Follows the directions of the assignment.

B- through B+: Offers a proficient demonstration of the learning outcomes using the tools and methodologies covered in class, but which could be further enhanced with revision. Mostly follows the directions of the assignment.

C or C+: Effectively demonstrates the learning outcomes, but less proficiently; could use revision to demonstrate more skillful and nuanced command of tools and methodologies covered in the class.  Misses some of the directions of the assignment.

D: Minimally demonstrates the basic learning outcomes; outcomes are not fully realized or well­-controlled and would benefit from significant revision.

F: Does not meet the outcome(s) requirement; the trait(s) are not adequately demonstrated and require substantial revision on multiple levels.  Does not follow the directions of the assignment.

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